ON GLOBALIZATION

Author:George Soros
Translator(s):Võ Kiều Linh
Genre:Kinh tế - Quản trị
Dimensions:14,5x20,5 cm
Length:168
Cover:Bìa mềm, tay gấp
Publication Date:2009
Price:35,000VND

This is a paperbound reprint of a 2002 book. Arguing that economic globalization has led to the creation of wealth but that the distribution of goods has been lopsided, financier Soros puts forth some recommendations towards the reform of the global economy. He argues that the international financial and trade institutions need to be reformed and suggests that although the World Trade Organization's rules-based system is good for the transfer of private goods, it needs to be complemented by an incentives based system for the provision of public good. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR Economist

In his latest book, 'On Globalization,' Mr. Soros demonstrates that he has laudable goals and some good instincts.

Never before have we stood to gain or lose as much from understanding the international economy. Scandals plague the world's largest corporations, the American trade deficit has soared to historic heights, and international organizations from the World Bank to the WTO are accused of being inefficient and corrupt. Is our global economy as unhealthy, and as unjust, as we think? And what can be done about it?

At this critical juncture, George Soros, a major proponent of globalization, takes to task the many institutions that have failed to keep pace with our global economy. At the same time, he offers a compelling new paradigm to bring the institutions and the economy back into necessary alignment. Economics are amoral, he argues - but neither our society nor our economy can afford to function without a distinct system of right and wrong. As we look toward the future and wonder what's ailing our economy, where our jobs are going, and whether the power of economics can be harnessed for positive changes, this thoroughly updated edition of George Soros on Globalization is a report no citizen of the world can do without.

Author Biography: George Soros heads Soros Fund Management and is the founder of a global network of foundations dedicated to supporting open societies. He is the author of several bestselling books, including The Crisis of Global Capitalism, Open Society, and, most recently, The Bubble of American Supremacy. __ from the Publisher

* An eloquent summary of the chief criticisms leveled against global institutions--even if you disagree with Soros' proposals for reform. __ Business Week

* In his latest book, On Globalization, Mr. Soros demonstrates that he has laudable goals and some good instincts. __ Economist

* A brilliant, powerful book...what makes this book so impressive is that he combines these insights with a humanity. __ NY Review of Books

* Crisp...Puts aside philosophical questions to concentrate on policies and solutions. __ Philadelphia Inquirer

* Financial mastermind Soros (The Alchemy of Finance, etc.) has made his mark as a philanthropist with a progressive foreign policy, fostering open societies. He equates globalization with "the free movement of capital and the increasing domination of national economies by global financial markets and multinational corporations." In this treatise, he explains how his vision to "make global capitalism more stable and equitable" acknowledges that antiglobalization protesters have a case against the mainstream consensus that the market works well. Instead of dismantling existing international financial and trade institutions, though, Soros suggests reform. Market fundamentalists, he says, are unwilling to modify existing institutions to create a level playing field; moreover, they're loath to create institutions to foster social goals like reducing poverty. Protestors, he observes, are "strangely blind" to the need to improve the quality of government and public life in poorer countries. Soros's suggested method provides aid that will "enable, encourage, and reinforce" voluntary compliance with international standards relating to environment, education and labor. His proposal? The richer countries in the IMF issue Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) for international assistance i.e., international reserve assets a process that shares the burden equitably, with the United States paying its fair share. A board of "eminent persons" chooses who's eligible for assistance, and a separate audit commission evaluates those chosen. After September 11, Soros notes in conclusion, Americans must recognize the world's precarious interdependence. Soros has an admirable track record and the virtue of hindsight (his foundations have done innovative work and his take on what could have been done in Russia over the past decade is compelling). This dry but vital book deserves attention and debate. (Mar.) Forecast: The United Nations is holding the International Conference on Financing for Development in Monterrey, Mexico, this week, and this book is sure to be talked about there. Discussions following the recent World Economic Forum in New York will fuel sales, too. __ Cahners Business Information. (Publishers Weekly)

* Arguing that economic globalization (defined as "the free movement of capital and the increasing domination of national economies by global financial markets and multinational corporations") has led to the creation of wealth but that the distribution of goods has been lopsided, financier Soros puts forth some recommendations towards the reform of the global economy. He argues that the international financial and trade institutions need to be reformed to contain the instability of financial markets and to correct the built-in bias towards developed countries that largely control them. He further suggests that although the World Trade Organization's rules-based system is good for the transfer of private goods, it needs to be complemented by an incentives based system for the provision of public goods. __ Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

(Source: www.barnesandnoble.com / Editorial Reviews)

* Financial mastermind Soros (The Alchemy of Finance, etc.) has made his mark as a philanthropist with a progressive foreign policy, fostering open societies. He equates globalization with "the free movement of capital and the increasing domination of national economies by global financial markets and multinational corporations." In this treatise, he explains how his vision to "make global capitalism more stable and equitable" acknowledges that antiglobalization protesters have a case against the mainstream consensus that the market works well. Instead of dismantling existing international financial and trade institutions, though, Soros suggests reform. Market fundamentalists, he says, are unwilling to modify existing institutions to create a level playing field; moreover, they're loath to create institutions to foster social goals like reducing poverty. Protestors, he observes, are "strangely blind" to the need to improve the quality of government and public life in poorer countries. Soros's suggested method provides aid that will "enable, encourage, and reinforce" voluntary compliance with international standards relating to environment, education and labor. His proposal? The richer countries in the IMF issue Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) for international assistance i.e., international reserve assets a process that shares the burden equitably, with the United States paying its fair share. A board of "eminent persons" chooses who's eligible for assistance, and a separate audit commission evaluates those chosen. After September 11, Soros notes in conclusion, Americans must recognize the world's precarious interdependence. Soros has an admirable track record and the virtue of hindsight (his foundations have done innovative work and his take on what could have been done in Russia over the past decade is compelling). This dry but vital book deserves attention and debate. __ Publishers Weekly

* Renowned international investor and financial guru Soros outlines the problems of globalization, limiting its meaning here to "the free movement of capital and the increasing domination of national economies by global financial markets and multinational corporations." Thus, Soros does not delve into the social or cultural applications of globalization. Criticism instead is leveled on both the "market fundamentalists"--Reagan-Thatcher types who seek to remove all impediments (taxation and regulation) to international investing--and the antiglobalization activists, who see the phenomenon as immoral. An admitted fan of globalization, Soros contends that the market is amoral but that certain reforms are necessary to ensure ethical standards. Soros' conclusion is that international institutions have not kept pace with the international economy, and a true "open society" (the title of Soros' last book) relies on that progress. A follow-up is in the offing, as the author is anxious to further expand on his open-society idea. Though the subject matter is complicated, Soros' simplified treatment makes this a timely and necessary title for any basic economy collection. Mary Frances Wilkens (Booklist)

(Source: www.amazon.com / Editorial Reviews)

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